Please click on the condition below for a more detailed description:

Myopia

What is Myopia?

  • Myopia is the medical term for ‘nearsightedness’.
  • In a myopic eye, near objects such as a book may be seen clearly, however, distant objects appear blurred.
  • Having an eyeball that is too long or a cornea that has too much curvature are usually the reasons for myopia.
    • The excess length or curvature causes light entering the eye to focus in front of the retina, which causes the distance blur.

What are the Symptoms of Myopia?

  • Blurred distance vision
  • Headaches
  • Excessive squinting

How Common is Myopia?

  • Being nearsighted is very common in the United States.
    • Nearly 25-30% of the population is myopic
  • Certain groups of people are more at risk for myopia due to genetics or lifestyles
    • People with myopic parents, Asian-Americans and people working in jobs that involve a lot of reading tend to be myopic more often

What Causes Myopia?

  • Most myopia is genetic, meaning you inherit it from mom and dad
  • Some evidence points to excessive near work and the stress that causes on the eye as a potential cause of myopia as well.
    • People who spend a lot of their time reading or those who work extensively on computers tend to be at higher risk for myopia development

When does Myopia Occur?

  • Myopia generally develops during childhood.
    • It usually progresses during puberty until around the age of 20.
  • Myopia can also develop due to other causes at any stage during life.
    • Diabetes, improper contact lens wear, cataract development and eye injuries are also potential sources of myopia development
  • Myopia can also occur if the eye fails to properly focus at night.
    • This form of myopia is called “night myopia”

How is Myopia Diagnosed?

  • Diagnosing myopia begins with a comprehensive eye exam at Blount County Eye Center
    • During this exam, your doctor uses tests such as visual acuity and machines such as a phoropter to determine the degree of myopia
    • Sometimes, it may be necessary for your doctor to use eye drops to evaluate the health of your eyes more thoroughly

How is Myopia Treated?

  • Eyeglasses
  • Contact Lenses
  • Orthokeratology
  • Refractive Surgery
  • Vision Therapy for Stress-Related Myopia

 

Hyperopia

What is Hyperopia?

  • Hyperopia is the medical term for ‘farsightedness’.

  • In a hyperopic eye, distant objects such as a movie screen may be seen clearly, however, near objects do not properly focus.
  • Having an eyeball that is too short or a cornea that has too little curvature are usually the reasons for hyperopia.
    • The short length or lack of curvature causes light entering the eye not to focus properly on the retina, which causes blurred vision.

What are the Symptoms of Hyperopia?

  • Blurred near vision
  • Eye strain, fatigue and headaches
  • Difficulty concentrating or maintaining focus
  • Burning or irritated eyes

How Common is Hyperopia?

  • Being farsighted is very common in the United States.
    • Nearly 50% of the population has some degree of hyperopia
  • Certain groups of people are more at risk for hyperopia due to genetics or lifestyles
    • People with hyperopic parents and African-Americans tend to be hyperopic more often

What Causes Hyperopia?

  • Most hyperopia is genetic, meaning you inherit it from mom and dad
  • Some evidence points to environmental factors as a potential cause of hyperopia as well.

When does Hyperopia Occur?

  • Hyperopia generally develops during childhood.
    • Most people are born with some degree of hyperopia

How is Hyperopia Diagnosed?

  • Diagnosing hyperopia begins with a comprehensive eye exam at Blount County Eye Center
    • During this exam, your doctor uses tests such as visual acuity and machines such as a phoropter to determine the degree of hyperopia
    • Sometimes, it may be necessary for your doctor to use eye drops to evaluate the health of your eyes more thoroughly

How is Hyperopia Treated?

  • If mild, some people are able to compensate for their hyperopia without vision correction
  • Eyeglasses
  • Contact Lenses
  • Vision Therapy for Focusing-Related Problems

 

Astigmatism

What is Astigmatism?

  • Astigmatism is a vision condition that leads to blurred vision at any distance
  • In an astigmatic eye, the cornea or the lens have an irregular shape
    • This irregular shape prevents light entering the eye to focus properly on the retina. Light focuses on two different areas of the retina

What are the Symptoms of Astigmatism?

  • Blurred/Distorted vision
  • Headaches and eye strain

How Common is Astigmatism?

  • Astigmatism is very common in the United States.
    • Most people have some degree of astigmatism
      • Usually small amounts do not interfere with normal vision and require no treatment
      • Larger amounts can significantly alter vision and lead to other associated problems such as headaches
  • Astigmatism commonly occurs with other vision conditions such as myopia or hyperopia

What Causes Astigmatism?

  • It is believed that most astigmatism is genetic
    • Astigmatism can also result from injuries or surgeries on the eyes and from increase near work
  • Often times, doctors will use the analogy of a basketball versus a football to explain astigmatism
    • A normal eye has a round shape like a basketball while an astigmatic eye takes on a shape more like a football with different curvatures along the surface of the cornea or lens

When does Astigmatism Occur?

  • Astigmatism is usually present at birth
    • It can increase or decrease over time or with the onset of certain diseases

How is Astigmatism Diagnosed?

  • Diagnosing astigmatism begins with a comprehensive eye exam at Blount County Eye Center
    • During this exam, your doctor uses tests such as visual acuity and machines such as a phoropter and keratometer to determine the degree of astigmatism
    • Sometimes, it may be necessary for your doctor to use eye drops to evaluate the health of your eyes more thoroughly

How is Astigmatism Treated?

  • Eyeglasses
  • Contact Lenses
  • Orthokeratology
  • Refractive Surgery

 

Amblyopia

What is Amblyopia?

  • Amblyopia is the medical term for a ‘lazy eye’
    • It is the loss/lack of visual development in one of the eyes in the area of central vision
      • Peripheral vision is usually not affected
    • It is not completely correctable with glasses or contact lenses
    • It is not related to any particular eye health issues

What are the Symptoms of Amblyopia?

  • Bumping into things on one side
  • Favoring one eye over the other
  • Crossed eyes
  • Other symptoms are not as obvious

What Causes Amblyopia?

  • Amblyopia can result from the two eyes not working properly together
    • It is often associated with a large difference in prescription between the two eyes or with being cross-eyed
    • It can also develop as a result of a childhood cataract

When does Amblyopia Occur?

  • Amblyopia usually develops before age 6
    • Children born premature are at a higher risk for amblyopia
  • The chances of developing amblyopia in adulthood are relatively small

How is Amblyopia Diagnosed?

  • Diagnosing amblyopia begins with a comprehensive eye exam at Blount County Eye Center
    • Early diagnosis is critical for intervention and treatment
  • Children are recommended to have a comprehensive eye exam by the age of 6 months and again at age 3 to monitor visual development

How is Amblyopia Treated?

  • Prescription Lenses
  • Prisms
  • Vision Therapy
  • Eye-Patching

Amblyopia Resource

 

 

Presbyopia

  • What is Presbyopia?

    • Presbyopia the medical term for a condition in which the lens of the eye loses its ability to focus properly
      • This makes seeing near objects difficult

    What are the Symptoms of Presbyopia?

    • Holding reading/near material further away
    • Blurred vision at near
    • Eye fatigue/Headaches

    How Common is Presbyopia?

    • Presbyopia occurs in everyone after a certain age
      • People usually begin to notice presbyopia around age 40

    What Causes Presbyopia?

    • Presbyopia is a normal part of aging
      • It is not a disease

    When does Presbyopia Occur?

    • Presbyopia occurs gradually over years
    • It usually becomes noticeable around the age of 40

    How is Presbyopia Diagnosed?

    • Diagnosing presbyopia begins with a comprehensive eye exam at Blount County Eye Center
      • During this exam, your doctor uses tests to evaluate your vision and your ability to focus on objects close to you

    How is Presbyopia Treated?

    • Reading GlassesBifocals
    • Trifocals
    • Contact Lenses

 

 

Emmetropia

What is Emmetropia?

  • Emmetropia is the medical term used to describe an eye with an ideal combination of both power and eyeball length
  • Images are perfectly focused on the retina

How is Emmetropia Treated?

  • No corrective lenses are needed for an emmetropic eye.